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The use of money in the UK has changed throughout history.  This information is intended to help understand the currency used and the values involved.

1976 (Decimal Day) to the present.

100 new pence = 1 pound

1976 - Typical wage of  26 a week for manual work and 150 a month for office work

2014 - Typical manual wage of 220 a week and office work about 1500 a month

Pre 1976 money

4 farthings = 1 pence
12 pence = 1 shilling
2 shillings = 1 florin
2 shillings and sixpence = 1 half a crown
5 shillings = a crown
20 shillings = 1 pound
21 shillings = 1 guinea

1950 - Typical manual was of 6 a week and 14 for higher paid workers.

1850 - Typical manual wage of 1/- 8d a week and 3/- for higher paid workers.
 


The ten shilling note was the smallest paper note denomination.
 


The pound note was the main currency unit for most transactions.
 


The 5 pound note was larger that the one pound note.


The 50 pound note was the largest denomination in regular circulation

 

"Silver coins" were made of nickel silver alloy and were the higher denomination coins.

Crown = 5 shillings (not in general circulation)
A - Half Crown = 2 shillings and sixpence
B - Florin = 2 shillings
C - Shilling = 12 pence
D - Sixpence = 6 pence
E - Thrupence = 3 pence

Shillings came in English (C2) and Scottish (C1) forms.

The sixpence design varied over time.
 

 
 

Small denomination coins were generally called "coppers".  They were made of base metal and copper alloy and pressed with a ridged rim.

M - Thrupenny bit = 3 pence
N - Penny = 1 pence
O - Ha'pney = 1/2 pence
P - Farthing = 1/4 pence